Intelligent Monitoring for Animal Feed Silos

New technology can alert farmers when animal feed silos are almost empty, and automatic emails can even be sent to their feed supplier to place an order.

To find out how much animal feed is in a silo, traditionally farmers have either used a viewing hatch on the silo or banged on the silo’s side with a mallet. With a huge margin for error, there was scope for costly mistakes like over filling bins and wasting animal feed. Climbing 

Now an innovative Internet of Things sensor can help a farmer to accurately track how much feed is being stored.

Accurate, Real-Time Data

Colin Phillipson, co-founder of Glas Data explains: “Our sensor tracks the weight of the silo in real time. It is quick and easy to install and monitors the weight of the silo and how much animal feed it contains, by translating the compression of the silo’s legs into weight.”

Glas Data works with Ver Facil, a specialist Internet of Things sensor installer. LoRaWAN sensors work over long ranges of up to 20 miles, and as they are low power, their batteries will last for several years. Using LoRaWAN sensors means that farmers don’t have to rely on mobile coverage, as the data is transmitted via an antenna which is normally installed on a farm building.

With Glas Data’s system, data from sensors is displayed on the GlasCore dashboard - an easy to understand one-screen display which can be viewed by the farmer on their tablet, laptop or mobile phone.

“Access to this accurate data means farmers can measure efficiencies, by monitoring the amount of feed used each day and tracking data over time. It will also be possible to calculate the feed consumption per animal and to correlate this against other productivity metrics,” adds Colin Phillipson.

Automating the monitoring of animal feed storage saves farmers time as they will no longer have to make manual checks on feed silos. The accuracy of the sensor readings also means that over or under ordering animal feed will be a thing of the past.

Automatic Animal Feed Ordering

Glas Data’s system can also be set up to send an email to a farmer’s feed supplier automatically when a delivery of animal feed is required.

“The system is flexible allowing farmers to set their own thresholds, so feed orders can be placed exactly when they need them to be, without the farmer having to remember or place an order manually.

“From the feed suppliers’ point of view, our system will help them to pre-plan their orders and identify peak times,” says Colin Phillipson.

To find out more about Glas Data’s animal feed silo monitoring solution, please email eleanor.whitlock@glas-data.com or call 07485 017650. Feed bin


New service gives farmers and food producers real-time alerts about their operations

A specialist agri-tech business based in Cornwall, has introduced a new service to give farmers and food producers access to real-time alerts about their operations. 

With the ability to alert when action needs to be taken on everything from water leaks to temperature fluctuations in cold food storage, it has the potential to save significant amounts of time and money.

Glas Data has spent three years developing and refining its GlasCore dashboard, which displays all of a farm’s data in one easy to understand dashboard, which can be primarily viewed on a mobile phone, tablet or computer. 

The latest development is the introduction of real-time alerts. The system can be set up to monitor the data that matters to the farmer and a text message or email can be sent to draw their attention to any issue that needs action. Alerts can be sent to multiple users.

“The system can be set up individually for each farmer or food producer, to track exactly what they need and alert them to issues of concern. This means they can react quickly and take mitigating action that could save significant costs, before small issues become a serious problem. The system has been designed to work with businesses of any scale. You can adopt this if you have only one thing you care about or if you need 1000's of sensors and alerts sent to 100's of employees,” explains Colin Phillipson, co-founder of Glas Data.

The technology has many applications and can be used wherever data can be collected. For example, sensors could monitor waste water tanks, and send an alert when they need to be emptied. For food producers, the ability to alert if the temperature of fridges or freezers reaches a certain level, could allow a quick response to save produce if a cooling system fails.

The system can also be used in dairy farming, where it could provide alerts on the volume of milk produced. The system can also monitor milk tank temperatures and alert when they are out of tolerance. For arable farmers, alerts on soil health (moisture and/or temperature) can be set up.

Other potential applications include an alert when gates are left open, water troughs need filling up, if voltages for electric fences fall too low, or to alert when a bore hole pump fails.

Colin Phillipson adds: “The system has been designed to be simple and easy to use. Technology can become overwhelming and use up more time than it saves if farmers and food producers need to log in to multiple apps and websites. With GlasCore, all of the data they need is available in one place, with one log-in and our new real-time alerts, means that even more time and money will be saved.”


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