Optimising Your Water Usage and Reducing Costs

Spot water leaks quickly and save money with a smart water meter.

The days of water leaks going undetected for months costing farmers thousands of pounds in lost water are gone, thanks to new smart water meter technology from Glas Data.

Water leaks are often hard to detect above the ground and when a farmer relies on taking water meter readings manually, it may be several months before a leak is detected.

The cost of an undetected water leak can be considerable. It is estimated that a water leak of one cubic meter per hour costs £70 per day, which adds up to £516 in a week and £26,000 over the course of a year.

Identify water leaks quickly.

Glas Data has developed a solution to help farmers and food producers spot water leaks quickly, so that they can take mitigating action before the costs mount up.

“Our smart water meter uses Internet of Things technology and LoRaWAN sensors which have a long battery life of several years and the ability to send data over a long range. This means that users can see real-time water usage for all of their sites in one easy to understand dashboard on their laptop, tablet or mobile phone,” explains Colin Phillipson.

The sensors are quick and easy to install and send data to an antenna which is usually installed on a farm building.

Glas Data’s system also allows users to set up alerts that will send an email or text message if water use is unusually high, which may indicate a water leak.

“Undetected water leaks can cost farmers and food producers a huge amount. Receiving an alert to let you know when to take action can mean significant savings,” adds Colin Phillipson.

Optimising water consumption.

Wasting water can also cost farmers significant amounts of money. Having accurate water use data means that farmers can manage their consumption, by monitoring water use over time and identifying ways to make savings. 

Benchmarking water usage and highlighting where efficiencies can be made, will allow users to understand how water consumption can be improved 

Glas Data’s technology also makes it possible to automate water flow with smart control valves to optimise water usage across the farm.

Cloud-based solution.

“Data is only useful if it is easy to access and understand,” says Colin Phillipson. “Farmers don’t have much free time, so we’ve designed our Glas Core data management dashboard to be simple to use.”

Glas Data’s cloud-based system uses simple visualisations, but also allows for in-depth analysis. The system is easy to connect to many different devices and can allow oversight of farming or estate operations on a single dashboard.

For more information about how the Glas Data can help with water consumption management and leak detection, please email hello@glas-data.com or call 07485 017650.


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